A hearing aid specialist has claimed hearing aids are unnecessary for people with hearing loss because they do not increase the level of sound in the ear.

The hearing aid industry is facing a major backlash after a survey found that more than one in five Americans would like to see more research done on hearing aids to improve their hearing.

The American Hearing Association said in a statement that more research was needed into the devices’ impact on hearing.

In the survey, released on Monday, almost half of respondents said they did not know enough about hearing aids.

It said more than two thirds of those surveyed had not been offered a hearing aid that met their requirements.

Tye said the industry needed to be “more open and transparent” about the information it provided, especially about the risks of hearing aids and how they could improve hearing. “

This means that for those who are looking for a hearing loss-reducing product, they should seek out hearing aids that meet their needs.”

Tye said the industry needed to be “more open and transparent” about the information it provided, especially about the risks of hearing aids and how they could improve hearing.

Tylenol, which is used in hearing aids for children and adults, was the leading brand among those surveyed.

The survey said it found that about half of those polled had experienced hearing loss.

More: Tylerol is used for adults and children up to the age of 19, according to the American Hearing Associations website.

About one in six respondents reported having been prescribed a hearing aids device in the last two years, and about one in four people said they had tried to improve the quality of their hearing by replacing their hearing aids with hearing aids made by Tylera.

Tydra is the most popular hearing aid brand among the survey respondents.

About six in 10 respondents said hearing aids could help reduce the level and level of noise they are exposed to, according the survey.

About half of the people surveyed said they wanted to try hearing aids at a younger age, while one in seven said they wished they could keep their hearing in place for longer.